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TAG >> Open Doors
 
( 9 Articles Found )

Trump's Travel Ban Affects 20,000 Students, Faculty in US Colleges

Will the decree, easily interpreted as a deep hostility to the world beyond America's shores, put off international students?

Why India is Taking a Record Number of Seats in American Colleges

The stabilization of the Indian rupee, better access to funding from banks and brutal competition to get into the handful of world class institutions at home are fueling the U.S college rush from India.

Foreign students in US at record high, China, India fuel boom

Twenty-seven percent of STEM students studying engineering in the U.S. are from India.

More than 1 million international students in the US but new enrollments are decreasing

The Open Doors report proves beyond doubt that US is still the number one choice for international students. But, will it stay that way? There is reason for doubt.

Trump Effect: decline in new student enrolments in the US

In 2016-17, 62,537 Indian students got F1 visas to study in the US, down 16.43% from the previous year, according to the latest Open Doors report.

Here is Why International Students Are Important to the US

Domestic enrollments are sliding down even as international enrollments in the higher education sector are scaling up. What are the causes and the consequences of both? Read more below.

This is how you can reduce the cost of studying abroad

A giant magnet to the higher-ed dreams of the Indian student, American universities require no less than a fortune to open their gates. But, is there a more dystopian(?) path to lessen the burden of financing such a dream? Hello, Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) by College Board!

In a First, a US University Insures Itself Against a Drop in Chinese Students

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has paid $424,000 to insure itself against a significant drop in tuition revenue from Chinese students.

US colleges slash budgets as international students shy away

Schools in the Midwest have been hit hard by the loss of Indian and Chinese students who pay the full freight to study in America.

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